Fiber To The X (FTTX)

Fiber to the X (FTTX) comprises the many variants of fiber optic access infrastructure. These include fiber to the home (FTTH), fiber to the building (FTTB), and fiber to the curb or cabinet (FTTC), etc.

FTTH (fiber-to-the-home): Fiber to the home (FTTH), is the installation and use of optical fiber and passive optical network technology, GEPON, from a central point directly to individual buildings such as residences, apartment buildings and businesses to provide high-speed Internet access. FTTH dramatically increases the connection speeds available to computer users compared with technologies now used in most places.

FTTP (fiber-to-the-premises): This term is used either as a blanket term for both FTTH and FTTB, or where the fiber network includes both homes and small businesses.

FTTB (fiber-to-the-building, -business, or -basement): Fiber reaches the boundary of the building, such as the basement in a multi-dwelling unit, with the final connection to the individual living space being made via alternative means, similar to the curb or pole technologies.

FTTN / FTTLA (fiber-to-the-node, -neighborhood, or -last-amplifier): Fiber is terminated in a street cabinet, possibly miles away from the customer premises, with the final connections being copper. FTTN is often an interim step toward full FTTH (fiber-to-the-home) and is typically used to deliver ‘advanced’ triple-play telecommunications services.

FTTC / FTTK (fiber-to-the-curb/kerb, -closet, or -cabinet): This is very similar to FTTN, but the street cabinet or pole is closer to the user’s premises, typically within 1,000 feet (300 m), within range for high-bandwidth copper technologies such as wired ethernet or IEEE 1901 power line networking and wireless Wi-Fi technology. FTTC is occasionally ambiguously called FTTP (fiber-to-the-pole), leading to confusion with the distinct fiber-to-the-premises system.

As a global leader in delivering FTTX solutions for service providers, Hanlan-Tech has the technology and expertise necessary for every type of network and application.


Key Features
   Large capacity and coverage

   Flexible deployment options

   Fewer fibers and modules – lowering CAPEX

   High reliability – reducing OPEX

   High QoS (Quality of Service)

   Flexible DBA (Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation)

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